New Mexico Weather: 11/17/17

Yesterday was sunny, warm and still in Socorro.  It was a beautiful day, and I didn’t spend nearly enough of it outside.  I am still recovering from a cold, but I am getting better.

This morning has been sunny, cool and clear.

National Weather Service (NWS) in Albuquerque forecasts (for Socorro) a mostly sunny day, with a high temperature of 77 F.  The winds will be from the south at 5-10 mph, increasing to 15-20 mph by this afternoon.  This evening will be partly cloudy, with a low temperature of 38 F. Winds will be from the west at 15 mph, becoming north after midnight.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Magdalena) a mostly sunny day, with a high temperature of 70 F. The winds will be from the southwest at 10-15 mph, increasing to 20-25 mph, gusting as high as 35 mph, in the afternoon.  This evening will be partly cloudy, with a low temperature of 33 F. Winds will be from the west at 15-25 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Rio Rancho) a partly sunny day, with a high temperature of 72 F.  The winds will be from the west at 5-10 mph, increasing to 15-25 mph, and gusting as high as 35 mph, in the afternoon.   This evening will be partly cloudy, with a low temperature of 35 F. Winds will be from the west at 15-20 mph, gusting as high as 30 mph, and becoming northwest after midnight.

The NWS has issued a Hazardous Weather Outlook and several High Winds Watches, Red Flag Warnings and so on concerning the strong winds that will accompany a Pacific cold front that will pass through the state later today.  The NWS Watches and Warnings  Graphic is shown below:

Due to the high winds and dry conditions, a Critical Fire Weather Risk has been issued for a ring that includes the eastern part of NM, as well as the west-central part of the Texas Handle.

The visible satellite imagery is unavailable at this time.

The infrared satellite imagery shows a few bands of thicker clouds moving across the state from west to east.

The water vapor imagery shows moisture streaming in from the Pacific and moving across the state from west to east.

The 12Z sounding from Albuquerque shows a well-mixed atmosphere.  There was 0.31 inches of precipitable water present in the column this morning.  There was no Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and no Convective Inhibition (CINH) present.  There was a moderate thermal inversion near the surface, and the 0-3 km average lapse rate was 5.7 C/km.

The hodograph shows that there was 34 kt of low-level shear (due mostly to directional changes) and 84 kts of deep-layer shear (due mostly to speed changes).

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show cool temperatures and low humidity, (based on the surface dewpoint depressions).  The winds are light, and the skies are clear, except for a few stations in the east.

The surface pressure chart shows a moderate pressure gradient across the northern and northeastern counties this morning.  The RAP shows that this gradient will spread and strengthen over the next six hours, which is why our winds will be stronger by the afternoon.

Synoptically speaking, the 300 mb NAM chart (from Unisys) shows strong zonal flow over the state today.

The 500 mb NAM chart shows no strong vorticity advection over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The 700 mb NAM chart shows a typical windy day pattern, with rising air on the windward size of mountains, and sinking air on the lee sides of the mountains.

The 850 mb NAM chart shows some weak Cold Air Advection (CAA) moving into the state from the west.  The winds blow weakly across the light thermal gradient from cool to warm.

The Precipitation chart shows that precipitation is unlikely today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

I am not looking forward to the windy conditions this afternoon.  I was debating going for a run, and perhaps sitting outside and working on my laptop.  I certainly will not be sitting outside, waiting to blow away, and I am still undecided on the running.

Thank you for reading my post.

The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The forecasted upper air soundings are from TwisterData.com.
The surface observation and upper level charts are from Unisys Weather.
The satellite data is from College of DuPage – SATRAD

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New Mexico Weather: 11/16/17

Yesterday was sunny, warm and still in Socorro.

This morning has been sunny, cool and clear.

National Weather Service (NWS) in Albuquerque forecasts (for Socorro) a mostly sunny day, with a high temperature of 75 F.  The winds will be from the south at 5-10 mph.  This evening will be partly cloudy, with a low temperature of 42 F. Winds will be from the south at 5-10 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Magdalena) a mostly sunny day, with a high temperature of 71 F. The winds will be from the southwest at 5-10 mph.  This evening will be partly cloudy, with a low temperature of 43 F. Winds will be from the west at 10-15 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Rio Rancho) a mostly sunny day, with a high temperature of 73 F.  The winds will be from the southwest at 5-10 mph.   This evening will be mostly cloudy, with a low temperature of 44 F. Winds will be from the south at 5 mph.

The NWS has issued a Hazardous Weather Outlook and several High Winds Watches for some of the northern mountains later this week and into the weekend.  No hazardous weather is expected today.

The visible satellite imagery is unavailable at this time.

The infrared satellite imagery shows no thick clouds over the state this morning.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The water vapor imagery shows nearly uniform moisture over the state this morning.

The 12Z sounding from Albuquerque shows a dry atmosphere.  There was 0.24 inches of precipitable water present in the column this morning.  There was no Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and no Convective Inhibition (CINH) present.  There was a large thermal inversion near the surface, and the 0-3 km average lapse rate was 2.6 C/km.

The hodograph shows that there was 20 kt of low-level shear (due mostly to directional changes) and 44 kts of deep-layer shear (due mostly to speed changes).

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show cool temperatures and low humidity, (based on the surface dewpoint depressions).  The winds are light, and the skies are clear, except for a few stations in the east.

The surface pressure chart shows high pressure in the northwestern part of the state this morning.  There were no strong pressure gradients present.  The RAP shows that the pressure will decrease everywhere due to diurnal heating, but no strong pressure systems or gradients are expected to develop for at least the next six hours.

Synoptically speaking, the 300 mb NAM chart (from Unisys) shows moderate, zonal flow over the state today.

The 500 mb NAM chart shows no strong vorticity advection over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The 700 mb NAM chart shows no rapidly-rising air over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The 850 mb NAM chart shows no strong thermal advection over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The Precipitation chart shows that precipitation is unlikely today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

Today will be warm, mostly sunny and precipitation-free in the Rio Grande River Valley.  Enjoy the outdoors today, if you can.

Thank you for reading my post.

The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The forecasted upper air soundings are from TwisterData.com.
The surface observation and upper level charts are from Unisys Weather.
The satellite data is from College of DuPage – SATRAD

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New Mexico Weather: 11/15/17

Yesterday was sunny, warm and still in Socorro.

This morning has been sunny, cool and clear.

National Weather Service (NWS) in Albuquerque forecasts (for Socorro) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 71 F.  The winds will be from the north at 5-10 mph, becoming south in the afternoon.  This evening will be partly cloudy, with a low temperature of 39 F. Winds will be from the south at 5-10 mph, becoming west after midnight.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Magdalena) a mostly sunny day, with a high temperature of 66 F. The winds will be from the north at 5-10 mph, becoming southeast in the afternoon.  This evening will be mostly clear, with a low temperature of 37 F. Winds will be from the southwest at 10 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Rio Rancho) a mostly sunny day, with a high temperature of 68 F.  The winds will be from the southeast at 10-15 mph.   This evening will be mostly clear, with a low temperature of 39 F. Winds will be from the east at 5 mph.

The visible satellite imagery is unavailable at this time.

The infrared satellite imagery shows no thick clouds over the state this morning.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The water vapor imagery shows nearly uniform moisture over the state this morning.

The 12Z sounding from Albuquerque shows a dry atmosphere.  There was 0.24 inches of precipitable water present in the column this morning.  There was no Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and no Convective Inhibition (CINH) present.  There was a moderate thermal inversion near the surface, and the 0-3 km average lapse rate was 3.7 C/km.

The hodograph shows that there was 11 kt of low-level shear (due mostly to directional changes) and 34 kts of deep-layer shear (due mostly to speed changes).

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show mild temperatures and low humidity, (based on the surface dewpoint depressions).  The winds are light, and the skies are clear.  There are no major frontal boundaries over the state so far this morning.

The surface pressure chart shows high pressure east of the Rockies.  There are no strong pressure gradients over the state this morning.  The RAP shows that the pressure will drop everywhere due to diurnal heating, but there will be no strong pressure systems or gradients expected over the next six hours.

Synoptically speaking, the 300 mb NAM chart (from Unisys) shows moderate, zonal flow over the state today.

The 500 mb NAM chart shows no strong vorticity advection over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The 700 mb NAM chart shows no rapidly-rising air over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The 850 mb NAM chart shows some moderate Cold Air Advection (CAA) moving into the northeastern corner of the state as a back door cold front creeps west from the Great Plains.

The Precipitation chart shows that precipitation is unlikely today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

Today will be a little cooler than yesterday, thanks to the back door cold front.  Even so, I am not expecting any precipitation and only a few clouds, given the limited moisture.  As the front approaches, the winds will increase, but nothing of great concern.

Thank you for reading my post.

The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The forecasted upper air soundings are from TwisterData.com.
The surface observation and upper level charts are from Unisys Weather.
The satellite data is from College of DuPage – SATRAD

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New Mexico Weather: 11/14/17

Yesterday was sunny, warm and still in Socorro.  Instead of enjoying it, I am fighting off a cold.

This morning has been sunny, cool and still.  There were a few clouds this morning, making for a beautiful sunrise.

National Weather Service (NWS) in Albuquerque forecasts (for Socorro) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 77 F.  The winds will be from the southeast at 5-10 mph.  This evening will be mostly clear, with a low temperature of 43 F. Winds will be from the northwest at 5 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Magdalena) a mostly sunny day, with a high temperature of 72 F. The winds will be from the west at 5-10 mph.  This evening will be mostly clear, with a low temperature of 40 F. Winds will be from the west at 10 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Rio Rancho) a mostly sunny day, with a high temperature of 74 F.  The winds will be from the east at 5-10 mph, becoming west in the afternoon.   This evening will be mostly clear, with a low temperature of 41 F. Winds will be from the northwest at 5 mph, becoming north after midnight.

The visible satellite imagery is unavailable at this time.

The infrared satellite imagery shows that there are a few thick clouds over the state this morning, but fewer than yesterday.

The water vapor imagery shows that there is plenty of deep moisture aloft over the state this morning.  All of it is slowly drifting into the state from the west and southwest.

The 12Z sounding from Albuquerque shows a moderately dry atmosphere, with a moisture peak near the surface.  There was 0.36 inches of precipitable water present in the column this morning.  There was no Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and no Convective Inhibition (CINH) present.  There was a large, broad thermal inversion near the surface, and the 0-3 km average lapse rate was 3.3 C/km.

The hodograph shows that there was 14 kt of low-level shear (due mostly to directional changes) and 31 kts of deep-layer shear (due mostly to speed changes).

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show mild temperatures and moderate humidity, (based on the surface dewpoint depressions).  The winds are light, and the skies are clear.  There are no major frontal boundaries over the state so far this morning.

The surface pressure chart shows that there is high pressure over the NM/CO border with a slight pressure gradient radiating through the state.  The RAP shows that a lee-side low pressure system will develop east of the Colorado Rockies and move east.  This will not create a stronger pressure gradient for us, as the pressure everywhere will drop due to diurnal heating over the next six hours.

Synoptically speaking, the 300 mb NAM chart (from Unisys) shows light, zonal flow over the state today.

The 500 mb NAM chart shows no strong vorticity advection over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The 700 mb NAM chart shows no rapidly-rising air over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The 850 mb NAM chart shows no strong thermal advection over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The Precipitation chart shows that precipitation is unlikely today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

I am expecting another pleasant day over the Rio Grande River Valley.  Today will be less cloudy, and slightly warmer than yesterday.  Hopefully, this cold will buzz off and I will get to enjoy some of the good weather.

Thank you for reading my post.

The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The forecasted upper air soundings are from TwisterData.com.
The surface observation and upper level charts are from Unisys Weather.
The satellite data is from College of DuPage – SATRAD

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New Mexico Weather: 11/13/17

Yesterday was sunny, mild and still in Rio Rancho.  I went for a four mile run and moved my weather station to a new location in the pleasant weather.

This morning has been sunny, cool and still.  There have been high clouds covering most of the sky along my commute to Magdalena.

National Weather Service (NWS) in Albuquerque forecasts (for Socorro) a partly sunny day, with a high temperature of 73 F.  The winds will be from the south at 10 mph.  This evening will be partly cloudy, with a low temperature of 43 F. Winds will be from the south at 5-10 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Magdalena) a partly sunny day, with a high temperature of 70 F. The winds will be from the south at 5 mph.  This evening will be partly cloudy, with a low temperature of 42 F. Winds will be from the west at 10 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Rio Rancho) a partly sunny day, with a high temperature of 71 F.  The winds will be from the south at 5 mph.   This evening will be partly cloudy, with a low temperature of 43 F. Winds will be from the south at 5 mph, becoming calm after midnight.

The NWS in Albuquerque has issued a Hazardous Weather Outlook concerning fog over the eastern third of the state.

The visible satellite imagery shows fog and low clouds over the southeastern plains of New Mexico this morning.

The infrared satellite imagery shows that some of the clouds in the southeastern corner are quite thick.

The water vapor imagery shows that there is plenty of deep moisture aloft over the state this morning.  All of it is slowly drifting into the state from the west and southwest.

The 12Z sounding from Albuquerque shows a moderately damp, cool atmosphere, with a moisture peak near 500 mb.  There was 0.45 inches of precipitable water present in the column this morning.  There was no Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and no Convective Inhibition (CINH) present.  There was a broad thermal inversion near the surface, and the 0-3 km average lapse rate was 4.1 C/km.

The hodograph shows that there was 19 kt of low-level shear (due mostly to directional changes) and 37 kts of deep-layer shear (due mostly to speed changes).

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show mild temperatures and moderate humidity, (based on the surface dewpoint depressions).  The winds are light, and the skies are clear.  There are no major frontal boundaries over the state so far this morning.

The surface pressure chart shows that there is high pressure over the NM/CO border with a slight pressure gradient radiating through the state.  Even so, the winds are still light.  The RAP shows, over the next six hours, that the pressure will decrease with diurnal heating, through the orientation and shape of the pressure system will remain.

Synoptically speaking, the 300 mb NAM chart (from Unisys) shows moderate, zonal flow over the state today.

The 500 mb NAM chart shows no strong vorticity advection over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The 700 mb NAM chart shows no rapidly-rising air over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The 850 mb NAM chart shows no strong thermal advection over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The Precipitation chart shows that precipitation is unlikely today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

There will be continuous clouds streaming in from the west along the jetstream.  I am not expecting any precipitation, but the skies will remain at least partly cloudy through this evening.

Thank you for reading my post.

The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The forecasted upper air soundings are from TwisterData.com.
The surface observation and upper level charts are from Unisys Weather.
The satellite data is from College of DuPage – SATRAD

Posted in Local WX, Photography, Practicing Concepts, Predictions, Satellite Imagery | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Mexico Weather: 11/12/17

Yesterday was sunny, mild and still in Rio Rancho.  I went for a brief run in the evening, but I am having trouble with my headphones, so I only ran for a mile.

This morning has been sunny, cool and still.  It has been a clear morning over Rio Rancho.

National Weather Service (NWS) in Albuquerque forecasts (for Socorro) a partly sunny day, with a high temperature of 60 F.  The winds will be from the north at 5-10 mph, becoming southeast in the afternoon.  This evening will be mostly cloudy, with a low temperature of 41 F. Winds will be from the south at 5 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Magdalena) a partly sunny day, with a high temperature of 65 F. The winds will be from the northeast at 5-10 mph, becoming southeast in the afternoon.  This evening will be mostly cloudy, with a low temperature of 40 F. Winds will be from the south at 5 mph, becoming southwest after midnight.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Rio Rancho) a partly sunny day, with a high temperature of 65 F.  The winds will be from the north at 5-10 mph, becoming south in the afternoon.   This evening will be mostly cloudy, with a low temperature of 40 F. Winds will be from the east at 5 mph, becoming northeast after midnight.

The NWS in Albuquerque has issued a Hazardous Weather Outlook concerning fog over the eastern third of the state.  This fog will continue each morning for the next several days.

The visible satellite imagery shows fog over the southeastern plains of New Mexico this morning.

The infrared satellite imagery shows no thick clouds, and the fog is not visible, either.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The water vapor imagery shows that there is plenty of deep moisture aloft over the state this morning.  All of it is slowly drifting into the state from the west and southwest.

The 12Z sounding from Albuquerque shows a moderately damp, cool atmosphere.  There was 0.26 inches of precipitable water present in the column this morning.  There was no Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and no Convective Inhibition (CINH) present.  There was a large thermal inversion near the surface, and the 0-3 km average lapse rate was 4.0 C/km.

The hodograph shows that there was 7 kt of low-level shear (due mostly to directional changes) and 50 kts of deep-layer shear (due mostly to speed changes).

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show cold temperatures and low humidity, (based on the surface dewpoint depressions).  The winds are light, and the skies are clear.  There are no major frontal boundaries over the state so far this morning.

The surface pressure chart shows that there is high pressure over the NM/CO border with a slight pressure gradient radiating through the state.  Even so, the winds are still light.  The RAP shows, over the next six hours, that the pressure will decrease with diurnal heating, through the orientation and shape of the pressure system will remain.

Synoptically speaking, the 300 mb NAM chart (from Unisys) shows moderate, zonal flow over the state today.  We are at the peak of a slight ridge to our south.

The 500 mb NAM chart shows no strong vorticity advection over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The 700 mb NAM chart shows no rapidly-rising air over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The 850 mb NAM chart shows some moderate Cold Air Advection (CAA) along the eastern border of the state.  This cold air is causing our fog problems.  During the day, the moisture is content to be a vapor, but then as the temperature cools with the CAA, the moisture condenses, forming fog.

The Precipitation chart shows that precipitation is unlikely today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The eastern plains will fight fog this morning, and for the next few mornings.  Here in the Rio Grande River Valley, we will have mild temperatures, light winds, and partly sunny skies today.  I am going to check on my garden, move my weather station, and go for a run, as I don’t think the weather will be nice for too many more weekends.

Thank you for reading my post.

The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The forecasted upper air soundings are from TwisterData.com.
The surface observation and upper level charts are from Unisys Weather.
The satellite data is from College of DuPage – SATRAD

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Satellite Image of the Week #46

A weak cold front moved through New Mexico from south to north earlier this week.  Along the leading edge of the cold front, there was a large mass of clouds, with a few showers.  You can see the frontal boundary clearly as the line stretching from just south of I-40 to just north of it on this image.

Thank you for reading this post!

Source:  College of DuPage – Meteorology

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