New Mexico Weather: 10/11/17

Yesterday was mostly sunny, breezy and becoming warmer throughout the day.

This morning has been sunny, cold and still.

National Weather Service (NWS) in Albuquerque forecasts (for Socorro) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 76 F.  The winds will be from the south at 5-15 mph.  This evening will be mostly clear, with a low temperature of 50 F. Winds will be south at 5-15 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Magdalena) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 73 F. The winds will be from the south at 5-15 mph.  This evening will be mostly clear, with a low temperature of 47 F. Winds will be from the southwest at 10-15 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Rio Rancho) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 73 F.  The winds will be from the northeast at 5 mph, becoming south in the afternoon.  This evening will be mostly clear, with a low temperature of 48 F. Winds will be from the south at 5 mph.

The NWS has issued a Freeze Warning for a few areas through this morning.  The Watches and Warnings graphic is shown below:

The visible satellite imagery shows no clouds over the state so far this morning.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The infrared satellite imagery shows no thick clouds over the state this morning.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The water vapor imagery shows that dry air has returned to the state.

The 12Z sounding from Albuquerque shows very dry air above 700 mb.   There was 0.32inches of precipitable water present in the column this morning.  There was no Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and no of Convective Inhibition (CINH) present.  There was a series of small thermal inversions near the surface, and the 0-3 km average lapse rate was 2.2 C/km.

The hodograph shows that there was 18 kt of low-level shear (mostly due to directional changes) and 37 kts of deep-layer shear (mostly due to speed changes).

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show cold temperatures and moderate humidity, (based on the surface dewpoint depressions).  The winds are light, and the skies are clear over most of the state.

The surface pressure chart shows that high pressure still exists near the NM/CO border, though a lee-side low is developing over eastern Colorado.  This will create a slight pressure gradient over the northeastern part of the state within the next six hours, according to the RAP.

Synoptically speaking, the 300 mb NAM chart (from Unisys) shows light southwesterly to zonal flow over the state today.

The 500 mb NAM chart shows no strong vorticity advection over the state today.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The 700 mb NAM chart is unavailable at this time.

The 850 mb NAM chart shows no strong thermal advection over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The Precipitation chart shows very little chance of precipitation over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

High pressure and dry air will be the dominant forces again today.  The air will continue to warm, as Monday’s cold fronts have mixed out completely.

Thank you for reading my post.

The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The forecasted upper air soundings are from TwisterData.com.
The surface observation and upper level charts are from Unisys Weather.
The satellite data is from College of DuPage – SATRAD

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New Mexico Weather: 10/10/17

Yesterday was mostly sunny, windy, and becoming cooler.

This morning has been sunny, cold and still.

National Weather Service (NWS) in Albuquerque forecasts (for Socorro) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 68 F.  The winds will be from the north at 5 mph, becoming southeast in the afternoon.  This evening will be mostly clear, with a low temperature of 43 F. Winds will be south at 5 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Magdalena) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 64 F. The winds will be from the east at 5-10 mph, becoming southeast in the afternoon. This evening will be clear, with a low temperature of 38 F. Winds will be from the southeast at 5-10 mph, becoming southwest after midnight.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Rio Rancho) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 64 F.  The winds will be from the east at 5 mph, becoming south in the afternoon.  This evening will be clear, with a low temperature of 40 F. Winds will be calm, becoming northeast at 5 mph after midnight.

The NWS has issued a Freeze Warning and for much of the state through the morning hours.  Temperatures are expected to drop to freezing or near-freezing levels, even as far south as the Albuquerque Metro area.  There are several Hard Freeze Warnings for the higher elevations as well.  The Watches and Warnings graphic is shown below:

The visible satellite imagery shows no clouds over the state so far this morning.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The infrared satellite imagery shows no thick clouds over the state this morning.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The water vapor imagery shows that some moisture has returned aloft.

The 12Z sounding from Albuquerque shows very dry air above 800 mb.   There was 0.21 inches of precipitable water present in the column this morning.  There was no Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and no of Convective Inhibition (CINH) present.  There was a small thermal inversion near the surface, and the 0-3 km average lapse rate was 3.2 C/km.

The hodograph shows that there was 7 kt of low-level shear (mostly due to directional changes) and 29 kts of deep-layer shear (mostly due to speed changes).

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show cold temperatures and moderate humidity, (based on the surface dewpoint depressions).  The winds are light, and the skies are clear over most of the state.  Clearly, the cold front has passed through the state.

The surface pressure chart shows that high pressure dominates the state, with a high pressure center of 1032 mb.  There is a slight pressure gradient on the edges of the high pressure system, but the winds are not strong at this time.  The RAP shows that the pressure will drop with diurnal heating over the next six hours, though high pressure will still rule the state today.

Synoptically speaking, the 300 mb NAM chart (from Unisys) shows moderate zonal flow over the state, particularly over the northern part of the state today.  The southern part of the state will have light zonal flow as the trough moves northeast and attenuates.

The 500 mb NAM chart shows no strong vorticity advection over the state today.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The 700 mb NAM chart is unavailable at this time.

The 850 mb NAM chart shows no strong thermal advection over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The Precipitation chart shows very little chance of precipitation over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

High pressure and dry air will be the dominant forces today.  The air is very cold, but it will warm up with diurnal heating today, and there is no more cold air advecting into the area today.  It should turn out to be a cool, but pleasant day.

Thank you for reading my post.

The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The forecasted upper air soundings are from TwisterData.com.
The surface observation and upper level charts are from Unisys Weather.
The satellite data is from College of DuPage – SATRAD

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New Mexico Weather: 10/9/17

Yesterday was sunny and warm, with a light breeze.

This morning has been sunny, cool and still.  We had a clear sunrise this morning in Albuquerque.

National Weather Service (NWS) in Albuquerque forecasts (for Socorro) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 75 F.  The winds will be from the west at 10-20 mph, becoming north this afternoon.  This evening will be mostly clear, with a low temperature of 38 F. Winds will be north at 15-20 mph, decreasing to 5-10 mph after midnight.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Magdalena) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 66 F. The winds will be from the west at 15-20 mph. This evening will be clear, with a low temperature of 28 F. Winds will be from the northwest at 10-15 mph, decreasing to 5-10 mph after midnight.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Rio Rancho) a mostly sunny day, with a high temperature of 64 F.  The winds will be from the west at 10-20 mph.  This evening will be mostly clear, with a low temperature of 34 F. Winds will be from the northwest at 5-15 mph, becoming east after midnight.

The NWS has issued a Freeze Warning for much of the state for tomorrow night.  Temperatures are expected to drop to freezing or near-freezing levels, even as far south as the Albuquerque Metro area starting tomorrow.  Also, winds will be strong in the northeastern part of the state, and several inches of snow is possible at higher elevations in the northern part of the state.  The Watches and Warnings graphic is shown below:

The visible satellite imagery shows no clouds over the state so far this morning.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The infrared satellite imagery shows no thick clouds over the state this morning.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The water vapor imagery shows that some moisture has returned aloft.

The 12Z sounding from Albuquerque shows a dry inverted-v pattern, with a little moisture aloft.   There was 0.29 inches of precipitable water present in the column this morning.  There was no Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and no of Convective Inhibition (CINH) present.  There was a small thermal inversion near the surface, and the 0-3 km average lapse rate was 7.1 C/km.

The hodograph shows that there was 30 kt of low-level shear (mostly due to directional changes) and 60 kts of deep-layer shear (mostly due to speed changes).

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show cool temperatures and low humidity, (based on the surface dewpoint depressions).  The winds are light, and the skies are clear over most of the state.  Currently, there are no major frontal boundaries over the state, but two cold fronts are on their way.

The surface pressure chart shows that there is a strong pressure gradient approaching from the northeast as two cold fronts drift into the state and interact.  The RAP shows this gradient increasing and the winds becoming strong over the next six hours, especially for the northeastern part of the state.

Synoptically speaking, the 300 mb NAM chart (from Unisys) shows strong northwesterly to zonal flow over the state today.  As it turns out, the trough dipped deeper than I had expected, and will pass through the northern half of the state by 00 Z.

The 500 mb NAM chart shows some strong vorticity over the northern part of the state.  It will help amplify convection ahead of the back door cold front, and help to generate snow for the higher elevations in the northern part of the state this afternoon and evening.

The 700 mb NAM chart is unavailable at this time.

The 850 mb NAM chart shows strong Cold Air Advection (CAA) into the state as two cold fronts merge and punch into the state from the north and northeast.  This will increase wind speeds and drop temperatures significantly!

The Precipitation chart shows that snow will be possible in the northern tier of counties just behind the cold fronts.

Today will be a day of transition as unseasonably cold temperatures punch into the state by this afternoon.  Depending on the location, temperatures will drop 10 F to 35 F throughout much of the state.  Snow will be possible at the higher elevations in the northern part of the state, and windy, cold conditions will dominate the northeastern plains.  Today will be interesting and unpleasant in many locations.

Thank you for reading my post.

The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The forecasted upper air soundings are from TwisterData.com.
The surface observation and upper level charts are from Unisys Weather.
The satellite data is from College of DuPage – SATRAD

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New Mexico Weather: 10/8/17

Yesterday was sunny and warm.

This morning has been sunny, cool and still.  It dropped into the low 40’s last night.  When I woke up, I saw my thermometer say 42.1 F.

National Weather Service (NWS) in Albuquerque forecasts (for Socorro) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 84 F.  The winds will be from the south at 5-10 mph.  This evening will be clear, with a low temperature of 49 F. Winds will be from south at 5-10 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Magdalena) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 78 F. The winds will be from the west at 5-10 mph. This evening will be clear, with a low temperature of 43 F. Winds will be from the west at 10-15 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Rio Rancho) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 80 F.  The winds will be from the east at 5-10 mph, becoming west in the afternoon.  This evening will be clear, with a low temperature of 46 F. Winds will be from the southwest at 5-10 mph.

The NWS has issued a Freeze Watch for much of the state for tomorrow night.  Temperatures are expected to drop to freezing or near-freezing levels, even as far south as the Albuquerque Metro area starting tomorrow.  The Watches and Warnings graphic is shown below:

The visible satellite imagery is unavailable at this time.

The infrared satellite imagery shows no thick clouds over the state today.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The water vapor imagery shows that some moisture has returned aloft, but it is still really dry.  The extremely dry air has pushed east into Texas.

The 12Z sounding from Albuquerque shows that the atmosphere remained dry again this morning.   There was 0.20 inches of precipitable water present in the column this morning.  There was no Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and no of Convective Inhibition (CINH) present.  There was a large thermal inversion near the surface, and the 0-3 km average lapse rate was 3.3 C/km.

The hodograph shows that there was 17 kt of low-level shear (mostly due to directional changes) and 31 kts of deep-layer shear (mostly due to speed changes).

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show cool temperatures, high humidity in the east and low humidity in the west, (based on the surface dewpoint depressions).  The winds are light, and the skies are clear over most of the state.  There is a surface dryline running through the eastern third of the state this morning.

The surface pressure chart shows that we are under no strong pressure systems or gradients at this time.  The RAP shows that no strong pressure systems or gradients are expected to develop over the state for at least the next six hours.

Synoptically speaking, the 300 mb NAM chart (from Unisys) shows light zonal flow over the state.  The trough is still to our northwest, but most importantly, it is expected to pass north of us.

The 500 mb NAM chart shows no strong vorticity advection over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The 700 mb NAM chart shows no rapidly-rising air over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The 850 mb NAM chart shows no strong thermal advection over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The Precipitation chart shows that the chances of rain are very small, statewide.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

Today will be warm and dry, though changes are on the way.  Today should be pleasant, and I am going to go hiking.  Tomorrow, the weather will begin to turn cold.

Thank you for reading my post.

The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The forecasted upper air soundings are from TwisterData.com.
The surface observation and upper level charts are from Unisys Weather.
The satellite data is from College of DuPage – SATRAD

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Satellite Image of the Week #40

This week’s image shows a tornadic supercell near Albuquerque, NM, last Saturday.  Notice the overshooting top.   Also, notice the strong convective environment, with many cumulus clouds forming all over the southwest.

Thank you for reading this post!

Source:  College of DuPage – Meteorology

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New Mexico Weather: 10/7/17

Yesterday was sunny, breezy and warm.

This morning has been sunny, cool and still.  I have not finished setting up my phone, so I will not post any photos of the weather this morning.

National Weather Service (NWS) in Albuquerque forecasts (for Socorro) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 76 F.  The winds will be from the north at 5-10 mph, becoming southeast in the afternoon.  This evening will be clear, with a low temperature of 48 F. Winds will be from south at 5 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Magdalena) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 73 F. The winds will be from the northwest at 5-10 mph, becoming southeast in the afternoon. This evening will be clear, with a low temperature of 45 F. Winds will be from the southeast at 5-10 mph, becoming west after midnight.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Rio Rancho) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 74 F.  The winds will be from the north at 5-10 mph, becoming west in the afternoon.  This evening will be clear, with a low temperature of 45 F. Winds will be from the west at 5 mph.

The visible satellite imagery is unavailable at this time.

The infrared satellite imagery shows no thick clouds over the state today.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The water vapor imagery shows extremely dry air over the southern half of the state this morning.  To our north, the trough moves east.

The 12Z sounding from Albuquerque shows that the atmosphere has dried out considerably, as compared to yesterday.   There was 0.13 inches of precipitable water present in the column this morning.  There was no Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and no of Convective Inhibition (CINH) present.  There was a large thermal inversion above 700 mb, and the 0-3 km average lapse rate was 2.9 C/km.

The hodograph shows that there was 30 kt of low-level shear (mostly due to directional changes) and 30 kts of deep-layer shear (mostly due to speed changes).

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show mild temperatures, high humidity in the east and low humidity in the west, (based on the surface dewpoint depressions).  The winds are light, and the skies are cloudy over most of the state.  There is a surface dryline running through the eastern third of the state this morning.

The surface pressure chart shows that we are under no strong pressure systems or gradients at this time.  The RAP shows that no strong pressure systems or gradients are expected to develop over the state for at least the next six hours.

Synoptically speaking, the 300 mb NAM chart (from Unisys) shows light zonal flow over the state.  The trough will attenuate and pull north this evening.

The 500 mb NAM chart shows no strong vorticity advection over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The 700 mb NAM chart is unavailable at this time.

The 850 mb NAM chart shows no strong thermal advection over the state today.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

The Precipitation chart shows that the chances of rain are very small, statewide.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

Today will be cooler and drier than we’ve seen for a week or so.  The trough has attenuated and moved north, leaving us with zonal flow and dry air.  It should be a pleasant early autumn day today.

Thank you for reading my post.

The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The forecasted upper air soundings are from TwisterData.com.
The surface observation and upper level charts are from Unisys Weather.
The satellite data is from College of DuPage – SATRAD

Posted in Local WX, Practicing Concepts, Predictions, Satellite Imagery | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Mexico Weather: 10/6/17

Yesterday was cloudy, rainy and stormy in the afternoon.  I took a few photos, but my phone situation is a mess and I’m not sure when I will post them.

This morning has been cloudy, humid and still.

National Weather Service (NWS) in Albuquerque forecasts (for Socorro) a mostly sunny day, with a high temperature of 85 F.  The winds will be from the southwest at 5-15 mph, becoming northwest in the afternoon.  This evening will be clear, with a low temperature of 46 F. Winds will be from north at 10-20 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Magdalena) a mostly sunny day, with a high temperature of 78 F. The winds will be from the west at 10-15 mph, increasing to 15-20 mph in the afternoon. This evening will be clear, with a low temperature of 42 F. Winds will be from the northwest at 15-20 mph, decreasing to 10-15 mph after midnight.

The NWS in Albuquerque forecasts (for Rio Rancho) a mostly sunny, with a high temperature of 78 F.  The winds will be from the south at 5-10 mph, becoming northwest at 15-20 mph, gusting as high as 30 mph in the afternoon.  This evening will be clear, with a low temperature of 41 F. Winds will be from the northwest at 15-20 mph, gusting as high as 30 mph, but then decreasing to 5 to 10 mph after midnight.

The NWS in Albuquerque has issued a Hazardous Weather Outlook concerning some isolated storms that will develop near the Texas border, as well as windy conditions in the west by this evening.  Flood Warnings are in place, as shown in the Watches and Warnings graphic below:

The visible satellite imagery is unavailable at this time.

The infrared satellite imagery shows no thick clouds over the state today.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The water vapor imagery shows that dry air is beginning to return to the state from the northwest.

The 12Z sounding from Albuquerque shows that the atmosphere is nearly saturated below 550 mb.   There was 1.04 inches of precipitable water present in the column this morning.  There was 565 J/kg of Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and -144 J/kg of Convective Inhibition (CINH) present.  There was no thermal inversion, and the 0-3 km average lapse rate was 5.8 C/km.

The hodograph shows that there was 21 kt of low-level shear (mostly due to directional changes) and 64 kts of deep-layer shear (mostly due to speed changes).  All of this led to a Supercell Parameter of 4.3.

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show mild temperatures, high humidity (based on the surface dewpoint depressions).  The winds are light, and the skies are cloudy over most of the state.

The surface pressure chart shows that we are under no strong pressure systems or gradients at this time.  The RAP shows that high pressure will form over Utah, creating a moderate pressure gradient in the northern part of the state over the next six hours.

Synoptically speaking, the 300 mb NAM chart (from Unisys) shows strong zonal flow over the state as a trough passes to our north.

The 500 mb NAM chart shows Positive Vorticity Advection (PVA) in the northwestern corner of the state, as a vorticity maxima drifts northeast.

The 700 mb NAM chart is unavailable at this time.

The 850 mb NAM chart shows some Cold Air Advection (CAA) creeping into the northern tier of counties this afternoon and evening.

The Precipitation chart shows that the chances of rain are very small, statewide.  This chart has been excluded from today’s post.

Today will be a day of transition into fall-like weather.  The temperatures will be cooler over night and the skies will clear.  We will also have breezy conditions all over the state as the trough passes to our north.

Thank you for reading my post.

The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The forecasted upper air soundings are from TwisterData.com.
The surface observation and upper level charts are from Unisys Weather.
The satellite data is from College of DuPage – SATRAD

Posted in Local WX, Practicing Concepts, Predictions, Satellite Imagery | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment