Westminster, CO, to Rio Rancho, NM

Yesterday, was a pleasant drive, minus about an hour of cloudy, rainy skies in South Dakota.  We punched west of the storms and went back to open windows and nice weather.

This morning has been mild, mostly sunny and still.

The NWS in Boulder, CO, forecasts (for Westminster, CO) a mostly sunny day, with a 20% chance of showers and thunderstorms, and a high temperature of 83 F.  The winds will be light and variable, becoming easterly at 5-9 mph.

The NWS in Albuquerque, NM, forecasts (for Rio Rancho, NM) a mostly cloudy night, with a 30% chance of thunderstorms (some of which may be severe), and a low temperature of 66 F.  Winds will be from the south at 10 mph, becoming east after midnight.

The NWS in Pueblo, CO, has issued Flash Flood Watches in southern Colorado.

The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) has issued a Slight Risk for part of our travel route.

Associated with the Slight Risk is a 2% Tornado Threat Ring.

Visible satellite imagery is unavailable at this time.

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show mild temperatures and high humidity (based on the surface dewpoint depressions). The skies are clear and sunny over our route.  Winds are light and variable.

The surface pressure chart shows there are no strong pressure systems or gradients, and none are expected to develop over the next six hours.

The HRRR simulated reflectivity shows that storms are expected to fire along the I-25 corridor.  Some of these storms have helicity tracks, and may be discrete.

We will see our high temperatures in southern Colorado, depending on when we leave and how much time we spend at different places.  According to the HRRR, temperatures will reach the upper 80’s in the afternoon.

The HRRR supercell composite shows non-zero values through southeastern Colorado and northeastern New Mexico this afternoon.

It looks like a pleasant drive this morning and afternoon.  We will have to watch the radar closely this evening to avoid running into severe storms as we enter Colorado.

Thank you for reading my post.

Sources:
The forecasts from the National Weather Service are from The NWS Homepage
The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The satellite data, model data, and forecasted soundings are from College of DuPage – SATRAD

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Dickinson, ND, to Westminster, CO

Yesterday, was a pleasant day in western North Dakota.  We drove around the Theodore Roosevelt National Park with the windows down, and did a few short hikes.

This morning has been mild, mostly sunny and still.

The NWS in Bismarck, ND, forecasts (for Dickinson, ND) a mostly sunny day, with a high temperature of 80 F.  The winds will be from the northwest at 5-9 mph.

The NWS in Boulder, CO, forecasts (for Westminster, CO) a mostly cloudy night, with a 50% chance of thunderstorms (some of which may be severe), and a low temperature of 57 F.  Winds will be from the northeast at 5-8 mph, becoming light and variable after midnight.

The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) has issued a Marginal Risk for part of our travel route.  The primary threats will be large hail (2″) and damaging winds (>70 mph).  We will have to be on the lookout for these storms as we head southwest.

Visible satellite imagery is unavailable at this time.

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show mild temperatures and high humidity (based on the surface dewpoint depressions). The skies are clear and sunny over our route.  Winds are light and variable.

The surface pressure chart shows there are no strong pressure systems or gradients, and none are expected to develop over the next six hours.

The HRRR simulated reflectivity shows that storms are expected to fire just east of our travel path.  We may be looking at a bunch of back-sheared anvils at sunset.

We will see our high temperatures in eastern Wyoming, depending on when we leave and how much time we spend at different places.  According to the HRRR, temperatures will reach the upper 70’s in the afternoon.

It looks like a pleasant drive this morning and afternoon.  We will have to watch the radar closely this evening to avoid running into severe storms as we enter Colorado.

Thank you for reading my post.

Sources:
The forecasts from the National Weather Service are from The NWS Homepage
The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The satellite data, model data, and forecasted soundings are from College of DuPage – SATRAD

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Dickinson, North Dakota, Weather: 8/5/18

Yesterday was an incredibly pleasant day along our route from Gillette, WY, to Dickinson, ND.  We stopped at Devil’s Tower and hiked for several hours.   A few storms formed well to our east.

By the evening, we were able to cruise with the windows down.

This morning has been sunny, mild and still.

The NWS in Bismarck, ND, forecasts (for Dickinson, ND) increasing clouds, with a high temperature of 81 F.  The winds will be from the northwest at 7-10 mph.  This evening will be partly cloudy, with a 30% chance of showers and thunderstorms, and a low temperature of 56 F.  The winds will be from the north at 3-7 mph.

The NWS in Bismarck, ND, has issued a Hazardous Weather Outlook concerning isolated showers and thunderstorms in the area.  The primary threat will be lightning.

The visible satellite image shows no clouds over western North Dakota.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The 12 Z upper air sounding from Bismarck shows a moderately humid atmosphere this morning.  There was 0.79 inches of precipitable water present in the column.  There was no J/kg of Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and no J/kg of Convective Inhibition (CINH).  The Lifted Condensation Level (LCL) was 353 m.  There was a moderate thermal inversion near the surface, and the 0-3 km average lapse rate was 4.2 C/km.

The hodograph shows that there was 19 kts low-level shear (due mostly to directional changes) and 40 kts deep-layer shear (due mostly to speed changes).

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show mild temperatures and high humidity, based on the dewpoints.   The skies are clear, and the winds are generally still.

The surface pressure chart shows that there are no strong pressure systems or gradients over the state today.  The RAP shows that none are expected to develop over the next six hours.

The NAM 250 mb chart shows zonal flow over the state today.

The HRRR simulated reflectivity shows that western North Dakota will be missed by a cluster of storms to the south.  However, by the late evening hours, a scattered storm may pass through the area.

The HRRR predicts that the high temperature will be in the low 80’s by 22 Z.

The HRRR dewpoints will be in the upper 40’s and low 50’s all day.  A secondary plume of moisture will move in from the southwest (shown in the image below).

The HRRR shows that the winds in the Denver area will remain light.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The HRRR also shows increasing clouds through the afternoon and evening hours.

Today will be pleasant, though a little humid.  Increased clouds will make photography on today’s adventures a little more interesting.  A shower or thunderstorm is possible this evening as well.

Thank you for reading my post.

Sources:
The forecasts from the National Weather Service are from The NWS Homepage
The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The satellite data, model data, and forecasted soundings are from College of DuPage – SATRAD

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Satellite Image of the Week #31

This week’s Satellite Image of the Week shows bunches of contrails over northern Mississippi and Alabama.

My favorite two contrails cross over northeastern Mississippi in the clouds.  Conditions must be perfect to get lingering contrails- the right moisture, the right temperature and the right upper-level winds.  If any of these are out of balance, the contrails will mix out, never form, or will blow away and distort.

It is amazing how many planes we have in the air at any given time.  You may think of Alabama and Mississippi as being unpopulated, and yet there are quite a few people in the air over these states right now.  Many of these contrails point towards (or from) Atlanta.

Thank you for reading this post!

Source:  College of DuPage – Meteorology

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Gillette, WY, to Dickinson, ND

Yesterday, we had a pleasant drive from Westminster, CO, to Gillette, WY.  It was cloudy for part of the trip, and we did go through some light rain, but overall, it was pleasant.  Once we arrived in Gillette, it was cool and windy.

This morning has been cool, smoky and still.

The NWS in Rapid City, SD, forecasts (for Gillette, WY) a sunny day, with a high temperature of 81 F.  The winds will be from the west at 8-11 mph, gusting to 16 mph and becoming northerly in the afternoon.

The NWS in Rapid City, SD, forecasts (for Gillette, WY) a clear night, with a low temperature of 58 F.  Winds will be from the west at 8-15 mph, gusting as high as 22 mph.

Visible satellite imagery shows clear skies over our entire route this morning.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The water vapor imagery shows dry air along our travel route.  There are a few patches of moisture, but it should be a dry day for us.

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show mild temperatures and low humidity (based on the surface dewpoint depressions). The skies are clear and sunny over our route.  Winds are light and variable.

The surface pressure chart shows there are no strong pressure systems or gradients, and none are expected to develop over the next six hours.

The HRRR simulated reflectivity shows no storms along our travel path today.   This image has been excluded from today’s post.

We will see our high temperatures in northeastern Wyoming or northwestern South Dakota, depending on when we leave and how much time we spend at different places.  According to the HRRR, temperatures will reach the upper 80’s in the afternoon.

It looks like a warm and sunny drive today.  We will stop by Devil’s Tower in Wyoming, and I think it will be great weather to do so.

Thank you for reading my post.

Sources:
The forecasts from the National Weather Service are from The NWS Homepage
The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The satellite data, model data, and forecasted soundings are from College of DuPage – SATRAD

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Westminster, CO, to Gillette, WY

We had a nice sunset last night:

 

Today is my last morning in Boulder, CO.  We will venture to North Dakota, starting this afternoon.  I have things to tie up here in Boulder, so I don’t know when I will start driving, so I don’t know where we will end up spending the night.  I have estimated New Castle, WY for now.

This morning has been mild, hazy and still.

The NWS in Boulder, CO, forecasts (for Westminster, CO) a mostly sunny cloudy, with a 40% chance of scattered showers and thunderstorms, and a high temperature of 86 F.  The winds will be from the north at 5-8 mph.

The NWS in Rapid City, SD, forecasts (for Gillette, WY) a partly cloudy night, with a 40% chance of scattered showers and thunderstorms, and a low temperature of 55 F.  Winds will be northeast 6-8 mph, becoming west after midnight

The NWS has issued a Hazardous Weather Outlook concerning strong thunderstorms in the afternoon.  These storms will have large hail and gusty winds.

Visible satellite imagery shows heavy cloud cover over our entire route today.

The water vapor imagery shows plenty of moisture aloft associated with the cloud cover.

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show mild temperatures and low humidity (based on the surface dewpoint depressions). The skies are clear and sunny over our route.  Winds are light and variable.

The surface pressure chart shows there are no strong pressure systems or gradients, and none are expected to develop over the next six hours.

The HRRR simulated reflectivity shows storms will fire in the early afternoon and we may see an isolated shower or thunderstorm along our route.

We will see our high temperatures along US-85, depending on when we leave and how far east we go.  According to the HRRR, temperatures will reach the mid-90’s in the afternoon.

It looks like a warm and partly cloudy drive today, with a few afternoon showers and thunderstorms possible.

Thank you for reading my post.

Sources:
The forecasts from the National Weather Service are from The NWS Homepage
The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The satellite data, model data, and forecasted soundings are from College of DuPage – SATRAD

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Boulder, CO, to Newcastle, WY

We had a nice sunset last night:

Today is my last morning in Boulder, CO.  We will venture to North Dakota, starting this afternoon.  I have things to tie up here in Boulder, so I don’t know when I will start driving, so I don’t know where we will end up spending the night.  I have estimated New Castle, WY for now.

This morning has been mild, hazy and still.

The NWS in Boulder, CO, forecasts a mostly sunny day, with a 10% chance of isolated showers and thunderstorms, and a high temperature of 90 F.  The winds will be calm.

The NWS in Rapid City, SD, forecasts (for Dallas) a smoky and partly cloudy night, with a  low temperature of 64 F.  Winds will be northwest 5-7 mph, becoming east after midnight

Visible satellite imagery shows no clouds along our route.  This image has been excluded from today’s post.

The water vapor imagery shows that we will ride in dry air all day.

The surface observations (from the SPC Mesoscale Analysis Map) show cool temperatures and low humidity (based on the surface dewpoint depressions). The skies are clear and sunny over our route.  Winds are light and variable.

The surface pressure chart shows that there is a low pressure system over Montana that will intensify with diurnal heating.  Even so, no strong pressure gradients are expected to develop over the next six hours.

The HRRR simulated reflectivity shows storms will fire in the late afternoon and we may see an isolated shower or thunderstorm along our route.

We will see our high temperatures along US-85, depending on when we leave and how far east we go.  According to the HRRR, temperatures will reach the mid-90’s in the afternoon.

It looks like a warm and partly sunny drive today, with a few afternoon showers and thunderstorms possible.

Thank you for reading my post.

Sources:
The forecasts from the National Weather Service are from The NWS Homepage
The upper air soundings and mesoscale analysis plots are from the Storm Prediction Center website.
The satellite data, model data, and forecasted soundings are from College of DuPage – SATRAD

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